AEGN

Awards

We encourage our members to be recognised for the great work they are supporting through philanthropic giving.

Environmental Philanthropy Award

Nominations for the 2021 Environment Philanthropy Award – now open.

Nominating your favourite organisations is an opportunity to highlight environmental philanthropy to a broader audience, inspire others to give to the environment and celebrate excellent environmental philanthropy.

We strongly urge you to nominate your favourite project and to encourage other funders and environmental organisations to nominate as well.

2021 Environmental Philanthropy Award

The Environmental Philanthropy Award is for current achievements from funding projects or organisations that specifically support the environment or climate change mitigation. The award also applies to projects or organisations where the main focus is in another issue area, and there is a significant co-benefit to the environment or climate.

Selection criteria

Nominations will be assessed on the below criteria:  

  1. Improves the conservation and functioning of Australia’s environment or results in climate change mitigation.
  2. Demonstrates a significant and immediate impact.
  3. Demonstrates that it aligns with one or more of the following:
    • Uses communication tools to either bring new and different voices or influence broad public sentiment about environmental protection or climate change mitigation;
    • Exemplifies effective advocacy that influences key decision-makers or changes public policy by using a range of tools including education, research, lobbying and litigation
    • Supports collaboration and coordination rather than competition or supports hidden backbone activities, or
    • Takes solutions up to scale.
  4. Specify the three things that make this a knockout nomination.

This award is for activity occurring in the last five years (2016-2020) – this may include design, funding, outcomes or impact.

Award eligibility

The Australian Philanthropy Awards are open to all members of the Australian philanthropic and broader social change community. This award recognises both the ‘funding’ organisation and the ‘doing’ organisation. You can nominate your own organisation.

How to enter

This year, submissions are entered online, however, we recommend preparing your nomination in a Word file first. This will allow you to save and review your entry prior to copying it into the online form.

Step 1. Prepare your nomination first in a Word document. Download the nomination template (doc)

Step 2. Copy the details into the online form where you will also find further details on eligibility.

Nominations close 5.00pm AEST Friday 16 July.

Questions?

Contact Ione McLean if you have any questions about nominating for the Environmental Philanthropy Award: ione@aegn.org.au

More about the awards

We have been sponsoring Philanthropy Australia’s Environmental Philanthropy Award since 2017, and are immensely proud of the winners and all applicants.

AEGN and Philanthropy Australia logo

The award recognises both outstanding environmental funding and the outstanding achievements delivered by projects or organisations as a result. It is an opportunity to highlight the depth, breadth and huge impact of environmental funding to a broader philanthropic audience to celebrate exceptional environmental work and funding and to and to both showcase and celebrate exceptional environmental work. It is an opportunity to elevate the role of environmental philanthropy and to inspire others to give.

Winners

2020

The Pace Foundation, The NR Peace & Justice Fund, Lenko Family Foundation, Melliodora Fund — Australian Communities Foundation Subfund, Sarah Brenan of The Hamer Family Fund, The Mullum Trust, Vicki Olsson and Beyond Zero Emissions.

The seven funders of the 10 Gigawatt Vision should be commended for working together to fund this project that is both visionary and practical. They showed that collaboration can achieve more than the sum of its parts and that by funding policy development, policy advocacy, good communications and a smart charitable organisation, government’s and industry can step up to address the greatest issue of our time – climate change.

Climate change presents existential risks to Australia’s environment. From increasing heat waves which dry out the landscape, to extreme fires, floods and storms which threaten plant and animal life, the risks of climate change are increasing. In the Northern Territory, extreme heat fuelled by climate change is creating unliveable conditions.

Developed in partnership with the Environment Centre Northern Territory, Beyond Zero Emission’s 10 Gigawatt Vision is a comprehensive plan to use abundant sunshine and low-cost solar energy to revolutionise the Northern Territory’s economy. The report shows that by 2030, the Northern Territory government could drive investment in 10 gigawatts of renewable energy — 20 times the current renewable energy target.

The 10 Gigawatt Vision put the Territory at the forefront of the global transition away from fossil fuels towards renewable energy. It described how implementation would attract private investment, be a catalyst for wider, long-lasting economic renewal, and provided recommendations for policy reform.

Subsequently, an oversubscribed investment round for one of the world’s most ambitious projects, the world’s largest solar farm (Sun Cable’s Asia-Singapore Power Link) has ensured this $20 billion project is on track to becoming a reality.

On the back of the Vision, Beyond Zero Emissions’ Chair Eytan Lenko was appointed to the Territory Economic Reconstruction Commission, ensuring renewable energy would be at the heart of economic policy discussion.

Members honoured for other philanthropy work

We also congratulate AEGN members for their outstanding contributions under other award categories. These include Carol Schwartz AO of the Trawalla Foundation for her Leading Philanthropist Award, the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation for the Better Philanthropy Award and the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal for the Best Grant Program Award

We would like to especially recognise The Balnaves Foundation and Guardian Australia newspaper, winners of the Indigenous Philanthropy Award, for funding to employ an Indigenous Affairs reporter whose insightful, inquiring and Walkley Award winning journalism dug deep into issues affecting First Nations peoples around the country. 

And finally, we congratulate Philanthropy Australia for their stellar work elevating and celebrating excellent philanthropy. 

2019

Melliodora Fund – Australian Communities Foundation Subfund (and six other sub funds of the Australian Communities Foundation, plus 10 other funders since 2014) for The Change Agency Community Organising Fellowship.

2018

Purves Environmental Fund and 27 donors to the Purves Tree-Clearing Challenge for the Tree-Clearing Alliance, made up of 22 large and small community groups.

2017

The Ian Potter Foundation for the Reef Life Survey in Tasmania.

Other awards

In 2020 we would like to congratulate other members for their outstanding contributions in other award categories.

These include Carol Schwartz AO of the Trawalla Foundation for her Leading Philanthropist Award, the Lord Mayor’s Charitable Foundation for the Better Philanthropy Award and the Foundation for Rural & Regional Renewal for the Best Grant Program Award.

We would like to especially recognise The Balnaves Foundation and Guardian Australia newspaper, winners of the Indigenous Philanthropy Award, for funding to employ an Indigenous Affairs reporter whose insightful, inquiring and Walkley Award winning journalism dug deep into issues affecting First Nations peoples around the country.

And finally, we congratulate Philanthropy Australia for their stellar work elevating and celebrating excellent philanthropy.